Breastfeeding is beneficial for both moms and babies! For most infants, breastmilk is the best source of nutrition. Breastmilk changes to meet the unique needs of your baby.

The Breast Pump Depot offers a variety of lactation support options. If your questions or concerns are not fully addressed, you can schedule a telephone consult with our lactation consultants. Virtual clinic consultations coming soon!

Soon-to- be and new moms can join our closed Facebook group for moms. The group is hosted by our RN, IBCLC lactation consultant. Breastfeeding support delivered your way, at your convenience.

Breastfed babies have a decreased risk of:

  • Asthma
  • Obesity
  • Type I diabetes
  • Respiratory disease
  • Ear infections
  • Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS)
  • Gastrointestinal infections
  • Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) for preterm infants

Benefits to Moms include:

  • Lower risk of breast cancer
  • Lower risk of ovarian cancer
  • Lower risk of Type 2 Diabetes
  • Lower risk of developing high blood pressure

Common Questions

Breastfeeding is beneficial for both moms and babies! For most infants, breastmilk is the best source of nutrition. Breastmilk is constantly changing to meet the needs of your baby.
Infants who have breastfed have a lower risk of:

  • Asthma
  • Obesity
  • Type I diabetes
  • Respiratory disease
  • Ear infections
  • Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS)
  • Gastrointestinal infections
  • Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) for preterm infants.

Benefits to Moms include:

  • Lower risk of breast cancer.
  • Lower risk of ovarian cancer.
  • Lower risk of Type 2 Diabetes.
  • Lower risk of developing high blood pressure.

You will know if your baby is getting enough milk by the amount of wet and dirty diapers a baby has. According to the CDC, healthy breastfed infants typically gain weight faster than formula-fed infants in the first few months of life but then gain weight more slowly for the remainder of infancy, even after complementary foods are introduced.

How long a mother breastfeeds is a personal choice, but the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that infants be exclusively breastfed for the first 6 months of life, with continued breastfeeding in addition to complementary foods up to 2 years of age or longer.

The American Academy of Pediatrics and the Food and Drug Administration do not recommend buying breastmilk off of the Internet, and instead recommend that you contact a milk bank.

Breastfeeding Laws

  • All 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands have laws that specifically allow women to breastfeed in any public or private location. Visit the National Conference of State Legislatures to learn more about federal and state laws that protect and support breastfeeding.
    Workplace Laws
  • The Break Time for Nursing Mothers Provision of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) requires employers to support breastfeeding mothers to express breast milk for 1 year after each child’s birth by providing mothers with reasonable break time and a private, non-bathroom space to express their breast milk. Visit the United States Department of Labor to learn more.

Travel Laws

  • Air travelers are permitted by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) to bring breast milk, formula, and juice in excess of 3.4 ounces in their carry-on baggage and it does not need to fit within a quart size bag (click here to view TSA rule). Ice packs, freezer packs, and other accessories needed to keep the liquid cool are also allowed in carry-on bags. All liquids and partially frozen accessories are subject to being screened by X-ray.TSA is required by the Bottles and Breastfeeding Equipment Screening Act (BABES act) to provide ongoing training to ensure TSA staff receive consistent training related to traveling with breast milk, formula, and infant feeding equipment. Visit the TSA to learn more about traveling with breast milk, formula, and juice. For tips on travel and breastfeeding, visit Travel Recommendations for the Nursing Mother.
When a mom and baby are separated, for any reason, a mother can use a breast pump or hand express her breast milk to continue providing breast milk to her baby. It is important that mothers who are expressing their breast milk know the guidelines for storing and preparing human milk.

Women have the right to express breastmilk at work. Workplaces of 50 or more must provide break time for nursing mothers to express breast milk.

Absolutely! Aside from the high cost of formula, babies who are breastmilk fed are healthier. Healthier babies mean fewer doctor visits. For working families, parents do not miss work as often to care for a sick child.

Breastfeeding Videos